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PAREXEL Paid Clinical Trial seeking volunteers with Chronic Plaque Psoriasis to participate in clinical research studies in Glendale, CA

The PAREXEL Early Phase Unit, located in Glendale, CA is currently seeking volunteers to participate in a clinical research study of an investigational drug.   Call us if you are:• Over 18 years old• Diagnosed with any of the following conditions: Chronic Plaque Psoriasis, Hidradenitis Suppurativa, Palmoplantar Pustulosis.  The study involves 1 screening visit, and 14 outpatient visits.  If you qualify and complete the study you may receive up to $3,290.00. Please reference # 235702

Sponsored by: PAREXEL EARLY PHASE UNIT

Stipend: $3,290

Length of Study:  18 weeks

Gender: Both Female & Male

Age: 18 +

Washout Period: None

In-patient or stay overnight at the research center?: No

California Clinical Trials Medical Group managed by PAREXEL in Glendale, CA United States.

1560 East Chevy Chase Drive, Ste. #140 Glendale, CA  91206 tel. (855) 814-8631

 

Study Scavenger Provides the Below Helpful Information

Health Information About of This Study

What Is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis (sow RYE uh sis) is a chronic skin disease. Chronic means that it lasts a long time, often a lifetime. Psoriasis affects more than 5 million adults in the United States. It appears about equally in males and females. Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or sore patches of thick, red skin with silvery scales. You usually get the patches on your elbows, knees, scalp, back, face, palms and feet, but they can show up on other parts of your body.

Psoriasis occurs when the skin cells grow too quickly. The body does not shed these excess cells and they build up on the surface of the skin, forming thick, scaly patches.  A problem with your immune system causes psoriasis. In a process called cell turnover, skin cells that grow deep in your skin rise to the surface. Normally, this takes a month. In psoriasis, it happens in just days because your cells rise too fast.

Psoriasis can be hard to diagnose because it can look like other skin diseases. Your doctor might need to look at a small skin sample under a microscope.  Psoriasis can last a long time, even a lifetime. Symptoms come and go. Things that make them worse include

  • Infections
  • Stress
  • Dry skin
  • Certain medicines

Psoriasis usually occurs in adults. It sometimes runs in families. Treatments include creams, medicines, and light therapy.

Types of Psoriasis

Psoriasis occurs in five different forms that affect both men and women. Most people have only one type of psoriasis at a time. Sometimes, one type of psoriasis will disappear and another will appear. Here is a brief overview of the different forms of psoriasis.

Plaque

  • Is the most common form
  • appears as raised red patches covered in silvery white scales
  • usually shows up on the scalp, knees, elbows and lower back
  • patches may itch or be painful and can also crack and bleed.                          –  National Institute of Health

Screening Visit

Screening Visit:  Potential candidates for a Study will participate in an initial screening visit to determine if they are appropriate for the Study.  When you first attend the screening visit for phases I-III, the study is explained in detail and you can ask any questions. If you decide to participate, the study nurse will review the informed consent form with you and ask for your signature and permission to proceed with the screening evaluations. –  –  National Institute of Health

Washout Period Explained

A period during a clinical trial when the trial subjects receive no active medication. The wash-out period is typically used to generate patient baseline data.   Every clinic has a washout period during which you are not allowed to do a study at the same clinic or any other clinic.

The minimum period is 30 days since last dose, however some washouts go based on last study procedure (such as out patient visits or how much blood you gave during the study).   The washout period may vary from study to study depending on the half-life of the drug. Certain studies like radio-labeled drugs will have a 1 year washout before you can do another radio-labeled drug.   In addition to the clinic’s washout policy, the sponsor may impose a longer washout period.  Some studies will have a longer washout before you can sign up.

In general, you can sign up and screen for another study during the washout period as long as the check in date is at least 30 days after your last dose in the previous study.  However, depending on how fast your body recovers from a study, you may want to wait the full period to avoid problems with screening.

People who screen too soon after a study typically have lower red blood cell, hemoglobin, hematocritand iron.  If these levels are too low, you could get banned from participating in studies because having low levels is unhealthy and unsafe for participating in a study.

Be forewarned that many clinic participate in the VCT (Verified Clinical Trials) program which tracks when you do a study to ensure the next study meets washout periods.  I do not mention these clinics because it shouldn’t matter.  You know the rules and if you break them, the consequences can be dire like being banned from a clinic.  Sometimes the only way to drive this message home is to allow people to find out the hard way. –  –  National Institute of Health

In-Patient/Out-Patient Explained

There are two main reasons clinical research trials are done in an isolated inpatient setting where the patient stays overnight at a research clinic: 1) To protect the study participant:   Some study agents, usually challenge products, can make some people quite sick.  Study participants stay on the inpatient unit to receive 24 hour nursing care during these types of studies. Participants stay on the isolation unit until their laboratory test show they are no longer shedding the infectious agent.  2) To protect the public:  An infectious study agent that is given to a study participant may be harmful to the general public’s health.  Therefore, study participants stay on the inpatient unit until the possibility of giving the infection to someone else has passed.

An outpatient vaccine trial is a study that does not require an overnight stay in the hospital or research clinic.  Participants are given an investigational agent and have scheduled clinic visits to monitor how well they tolerate the investigational agent. Most studies require the clinic staff to follow up with subjects on a daily, weekly or monthly schedule.  Clinic visits can range from 2 to 4 hours, depending on the study and the type of visit.  –  National Institute of Health